Posts tagged ‘Scholz’

Tesla’s Frunk? Our Bikes Fit With Room to Spare.

We found this great little post on the Tesla website.

1 comment February 21, 2016

Di2 Electronic Shifting: What You Need to Know

Hey, did you charge your bike?

If Shimano — and now Campagnolo — have their way, this might become a more common question with the introduction of electronic shifting.

With battery life extending several months, charging will be a very infrequent occurrence.

For folding and travel bikes this actually makes a lot of sense — electric wires don’t care about tricky routing and potentially getting kinked during packing.

We have installed Shimano’s Ultegra Di2 on several Bike Fridays and it works very well. It even plays nice with the Capreo cassette.

We have done builds with a 56T chainring for a tall 56×9 top gear, and also with a compact 34/50 crankset for more mountain friendly gearing.

The frame does require a few special modifications.

First, we add braze-on mounts for the battery on the back of the seat tube. The battery then sits neatly tucked out of the way between the seat tube and rear wheel.

Added braze-on mounts for the battery.

There is a mount for the junction box on the front of the seat tube.

The front derailleur requires additional bracing for the motor to push against, so we add some reinforcement to the hanger.

Reinforcement to the hanger for the front derailleur.

And finally we can leave off the gear cable loops on the mainframe, as there is only the rear brake cable to run.

Once it is all setup, shifting is perfect; the front derailleur even trims itself as the chain moves up and down the cassette.

But does anyone need electric shifting? Yes, electric shifting has a very low impact on the joints in the hand and wrist, ideal for those suffering from arthritis. So if you’re experiencing pain or fatigue from shifting, you should consider the Di2 to  greatly extend the time you spend riding.

Hands down, our most popular bikes to convert to electric shifting are the Pocket Rocket Pro & Super Pro. Whether its for health, sport, or pure joy the Di2 will surprise and impress you. Check in with your local Bike Friday dealer to see if they have a Di2 to test ride.

17 comments February 9, 2016

Yes, the Haul-a-Day fits on a Portland Bus Rack

Set the Haul-a-Day at its smallest frame setting, 46 cm, flip the front wheel around and it fits on a bus rack for Portland, Oregon as well as Seattle.

Set the Haul-a-Day at its smallest frame setting, 46 cm, flip the front wheel around and it fits on a bus rack for Portland, Oregon as well as Seattle.

It might take a little bit of work, but not that much considering the rewards.

The Bike Friday Haul-a-Day, our new Cargo Bike, will fit on some mass transit bus racks.

It fit on the rack in Seattle, and Raz learned on Saturday it will fit on the racks in Portland, Oregon, too [photo above].

The Haul-a-Day is garnering a lot of attention. Here is a great blog post from one of those interested parties who joined us for a test ride session at VeloCult in Portland.

Add comment February 9, 2016

You Won’t Believe What This 80-Year-Old Did on Her Bike Friday

Dolores McKeough north of San Francisco, nearing the end of a long adventure.

EDITOR’S NOTE: It has been nearly five years since Dolores McKeough sent us this email, reminding us that it’s never too late to chase your dreams!

Hi, I got home 24 hours ago.

What a fantastic, beautiful summer. The adventure, fun, stress, friends made, country seen, and on and on.

The trip started innocently enough with friend Cathy in Tampa on April 3. It ended yesterday after I biked from Malibu where I was camping with three companions, whom I met in Big Sur, to Santa Monica where I folded my Bike Friday into it’s suitcase (after I took the wheels off since it had been serving as my trailer).

So many good things happened on this extravaganza trip including the folding experience in Santa Monica. I didn’t want to disassemble the bike on the beach, although it was a beautiful day, there was too much sand.

So, I went to the REI store where Robbie, the bike repair manager, suggested I use part of his work space. What a generous offer. I took him up on it and had the trailer wheels and attachment off in no time. I then folded the bike (taking the accessories off is the most time consuming part of the process) and put it in the suitcase (the former trailer).

The suitcase with the bike weighed in at 52 pounds at the airport (even though it was two pounds over the allowance Suncountry let it go). My duffle bag with camping stuff, clothes etc weighed in at 28 pounds. And, I had two carry-ons.

So I figure the bike plus all my stuff was about 85 pounds. That’s a lot of weight to ride across the country and partly up and down two coasts. But, I did it and feel great.

I just added it up! I think I rode about 1,000+ miles from Mt. Dora, Florida, to Williamsburg, Virginia; then 4,500 TransAm miles from Richmond, Virginia, to Florence, Oregon; then 1,100 miles from Florence to Santa Monica California.

That’s 6,600 miles on my Bike Friday with 85 pounds, from April 3  til August 29. That impresses even me.

As you know it is not simply the miles that count but the terrain, the road surface, the elevation, the weather …

It was wonderful. The picture was taken North of San Francisco. Note the long sleeves; the weather did not warm up til Santa Barbara.

Dolores

 

Dolores’ amazing journey was made possible by using our Travel System – an airline checkable suitcase that carries your bike and converts into a trailer! To learn more about Dolores’ bike, the New World Tourist, and our clever Travel System follow the links.

5 comments January 20, 2016

How a Custom Bike is Built: A Photo Essay

To celebrate Bike Friday’s 20th Anniversary in 2012, we commissioned a limited-edition 20th Anniversary New World Tourist that we custom built with as many top shelf MADE IN USA elements as we could. Although we don’t offer that particular model now, this photo essay shows the care and skill it takes to handbuild a custom Bike Friday in our Factory in Eugene, Oregon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 comment January 13, 2016

7 Steps to Buying a Bike on a Budget

Bike Friday owners at VeloCult

[EDITOR’S NOTE: Before opening Bike Friday in 1992, Co-Founder Alan Scholz owned and operated a few bike shops, and spent time as a national level racer.  Here are his expert tips on how to spend your money wisely when buying a bike.]

By Alan Scholz

Here are the basics I learned long ago about buying a bike on a budget, in order of importance.

1. Make sure you get a good frame in the right size. Get help making sure the frame fits your body by someone who is knowledgeable about fitting. Look for the best frame you can afford for the right type of riding you plan to do. Nothing else matters as much if you are on a budget. Everything else can be upgraded later if you are short on funds. Good designers, cyclists, and shop employees know this. It’s a good test of their basic knowledge.

2. Ride the saddle if it came with the bike just long enough to see if you can put up with it. If the bike does not come with saddle and pedals, thank the designer. That means they invested that money into the frame and wheels for you! Get a saddle that works for you — it is worth the individual focus. Price and weight are not good criteria to use to choose a saddle. You need to test ride a number of saddles and buy one  that is acceptable.

After you have been riding a while, you will be ready to trade up to a better saddle. When your butt is new to cycling, an acceptable saddle is as good as it gets. When you can ride 15-25 miles a day regularly get a nice saddle if you feel you need a different shape. Don’t believe anyone who says “this is a men’s saddle, or this is a women’s saddle.” Get one that fits and feels good. Ignore the rest.

3. If you can afford it, get a good set of wheels. After getting a frame that fits, wheels that are relatively light will give you by far the most bang for your buck.

4. If you are pushing your budget, buy cheap heavy tires. You will be replacing tires eventually, and then you can get some good tires. Wearing out tires will happen sooner than you think. That’s when you can buy better tires. You will be best served to really enjoy your bike, although frame and wheels will do the most toward that goal.

5. Next change your steel stuff out for entry level alloy if you must limit funds. Steel chainrings, brakes, seatposts, and derailleurs are a dead give away that they are sub-standard for someone who wants to be a real rider and can afford more than the minimum frame and wheels. They may work fine but they were put there to save money and they are heavy. Your motor cannot be changed. Weight matters. Used parts are often a good choice, but you need to really know parts design. Brand is not always a clear indicator. Ask a knowledgeable friend or expert consultant.

6. If your ship has come in, you can be picky but not arrogant about parts and prices. People who ”buy” into the sport usually do not become good nor happy cyclists. The most pricey and light gear will not perform for you out of the box if you have not already gained top level skills to utilize and appreciate them. From the experience in my shop days starting hundreds of folks to cycling, it takes as a minimum, three progressively better bikes as an adult to get to the top level, best for you. It doesn’t matter how much money you have.

7. Full Custom is usually not available or understandable to you until the third level of bike and thousands of miles. Small custom builders must charge 2-5 times as much as off the shelf mass produced bikes. If you do not know that they still mostly make less than minimum wages doing so, you will not appreciate their output anyway. Your best choice then is to buy an off the shelf imported bike and think you got a good deal. All small manufacturing concerns, one person to 60 people are squeezed by this math. Imports are cheaper because the factories are larger and they have the economies of scale. But they often also practice a lack of respect for good design that a small custom builder will have. Inexpensive or dear, a bike can serve you well if you take the time to choose. Take a ride with the local bike club and you will find there are far more important skills than a full wallet to keep up.

6 comments January 6, 2016

Haul-a-Day Camping Adventure

Who said you couldn't put a Cargo Bike on a car rack? Elle Steele refused to listen.

Who said you couldn’t put a Cargo Bike on a car rack? Elle Steele refused to listen.

Elle Steele packed up her Bike Friday Haul-a-Day, along with her kids, and came to Eugene for the Kidical Mass Camping Trip.

Read her adventure here.

Add comment August 26, 2014

Roadtreking on a Friday

Mike Wendland, who writes a popular blog for RVers, became a Bike Friday owner at the Family Motor Coach Association Reunion in Redmond, Oregon.

Mike wrote a bit about it on his blog in the section with live reports.

And, later, Mike filed this great video on You Tube about his first impressions.

 

 

Add comment August 18, 2014

Seeing Eye to Eye

Members of the Lane Regional Program for the Visually Impaired enjoy an afternoon in the sun riding Bike Friday Family Tandems along the Willamette River, thanks to the Northwest Association of Blind Athletes.

Members of the Lane Regional Program for the Visually Impaired enjoy an afternoon in the sun riding Bike Friday Family Tandems along the Willamette River, thanks to the Northwest Association of Blind Athletes.

By Raz

On the surface, Alan Scholz and Billy Henry might look as though they have little in common.

Alan, a Baby Boomer with gray edges up top, is Co-Founder of Bike Friday.

Billy, a Millenial with his hair spiked to a point in the middle, is Co-Founder of the Northwest Association of Blind Athletes.

Spend a little time chatting with each, and their kindred spirit shines as one.

Alan started his first bike shop as a teenager in his parent’s basement in Fargo, N.D.

Billy started his non-profit organization in his parent’s garage in Vancouver, WA.

Alan designs Bike Fridays to extend the wonderful experience of cycling to others.

Billy just took delivery of his first fleet of Bike Fridays to deliver the wonders of cycling to others like him.

“I started with six kids in my garage, doing powerlifting,” Billy said about the organization he started to get visually impaired individuals out and active. “This year we’ll touch more than a thousand people. For a lot of them, it will be the first time they get to experience the joy of riding a bike.”

It’s known as the power of one.

“We like to do whatever we can to help organizations like this,” Alan said. “We actually sell quite a few tandems that allow visually impaired individuals to get out on a bike. In working with Billy’s organization, we’ve been able to come up with a discount program for fleets of tandems, and we want everyone to know that opportunity is out there.”

A fleet of eight Family Tandems sat in the Bike Friday Showroom awaiting delivery to the Northwest Association of Blind Athletes.

A fleet of eight Family Tandems sat in the Bike Friday Showroom awaiting delivery to the Northwest Association of Blind Athletes.

Billy couldn’t wait to see his new fleet in action. He picked up the bikes at our Factory in Eugene, and drove them to the Rose Garden on the River Bank Bicycle Path for use by the Lane Regional Program for the Visually Impaired.

Each summer the Eugene-based program gets its students out for a day of riding. Billy was pleased to be able to provide the new tandems. On the same day, his organization had a ride going on in Portland. In coming weeks they will have rides in Salem and Albany.

Staff members of the Lane Regional Program for the Visually Impaired, parents and volunteers prepared for a ride on a wonderful summer afternoon in Eugene.

Staff members of the Lane Regional Program for the Visually Impaired, parents and volunteers prepared for a ride on a wonderful summer afternoon in Eugene.

“We spend the summer organizing rides throughout Oregon and Washington,” Billy said. “Last year we had a 60-year-old go on his first bike ride ever. This year a 55-year-old did the same. We have a lot of programs, but without question, bicycling is our most popular.”

The smiles and excited chatter among the group reflected the popularity of cycling. The Bike Friday Family Tandems are highly adjustable, allowing saddles and handlebar heights to be set for different captains and stokers. The 20-inch wheels provide a low center of gravity, and give small children more comfort being closer to the ground.

“The bike was great,” said Joel Phifer, a braillist with the Lane Regional Program. “It was nice to have a bike that fits someone smaller like me. In the past we’ve had to try to ride some bikes that were a bit too big for some of us.”

Billy smiled as he heard the review.

“I can’t thank Bike Friday enough,” Billy said. “This first fleet is just great, and I can’t wait for people to ride these. I’m going out and see how much money I can raise to get another fleet as soon as I can.”

 

Jonathan Gault steers while Mark Miller provides horsepower from behind. Jonathan's wife, Kristin, works with the Lane Regional Program and they have a son who visually impaired. They bought a Bike Friday tandem last year.

Jonathan Gault steers while Mark Miller provides horsepower from behind. Jonathan’s wife, Kristin, works with the Lane Regional Program and they have a son who visually impaired. They bought a Bike Friday tandem last year.

Joel Phifer captains while Kenza Minkler rides as stoker.

Joel Phifer captains while Kenza Minkler rides as stoker.

All shapes and sizes enjoyed pedalling along the Willamette River on a toasty summer afternoon.

All shapes and sizes enjoyed pedalling along the Willamette River on a toasty summer afternoon.

 

 

 

Add comment August 12, 2014

Haul-a-Day Celebration

HAD.picnic.pedalpower

Michael McKern toasted the release of the Haul-a-Day at a local celebration in Eugene, while powering the sound system on the Haul-a-Day provided by Pedal Power, a Eugene company and Bike Friday partner.

 

     EDITOR’S NOTE: On the first evening of August, a dynamic group of families gathered at the house of Shane MacRhodes to celebrate the official arrival of Bike Friday’s Cargo Bike, the Haul-a-Day.
     The event brought together the many individuals who contributed in various manners to the birth and growth of the Haul-a-Day from an idea spawned by Shane to the latest offering in Bike Friday’s line.
     Bike Friday Co-Founder Alan Scholz, who worked closely with Shane and others, wrote this Thank You note:

     Hi Shane, Missy, kids and Haul-a-Day revelers:
     Thank you so much to the MacRhodes family for bringing us all together at your house for what I feel in retrospect could be an important historical event for Eugene.
     What a great community this is that the long/cargo bikes brings together!
     The pieces are all there including what we all know is number one central, our families.
     I was so pleased and proud to be part of it with my family and the other families that were there. I feel we are all one family now.
     For a first event it was very appropriate to be at Shane’s. He came up with the idea for a Bike Friday Cargo Bike, and the name of the Haul-a-Day.  Thank you for that partnership with him Missy! It has been good for me. Clearly family fits the “necessity is the mother of invention” concept well with your family.
     If we want to do the right thing and keep riding and “Arriving by Bike” even after kids, then the Haul-a-Day is the right response.
     Such wide interest makes for huge moral support that new complicated far reaching products like this really need to succeed. Few products I have done before have gotten such vocal moral support for them than the Haul-a-Day.
     This was really a very special group with many years of very specific unusual experience and talent represented that is sure to put Eugene and the Haul-a-Day on the map of “Helping make bikes an integral part of our lives.”
     A big thank you to each of you for the contribution you have given to this unusual and exceptional design team. From the folks who made the jigs, brazed, welded, painted and assembled the bikes to all the beta testers.
     I hope you all know who you are. I could not have done my part without all of your contributions and support. Perhaps someone will want to record the specifics as it is getting to be quite an interesting and far flung story.

     I hope you all know who you are. I could not have done my part without all of your contributions and support. Perhaps someone will want to record the specifics as it is getting to be quite an interesting and far flung story.
     I feel it was one of those magic happenings.
     A special thank you to my daughter Fraeda who pulled this event together and not only cut a lot of the tubes for the beta Haul-a-Days but laced a lot of their wheels while sewing all their cargo bags. Thank you and love you Fraeda.
     Thank you to my wife Theresa for her unwavering support and her patience with months of me seeming to work 24/7.
     And to my daughter Hanna for keeping the rubber side down for the business while I have been so distracted by the scope of this project.

Best in Cycling to all of you,
Alan Scholz

      Shane MacRhodes, who worked closely with Alan in developing the Haul-a-Day wrote an entry on the night on his blog, FULLY LOADED.

Shane MacRhodes (left) talking Haul-a-Days with Lyn

Shane MacRhodes (left) talking Haul-a-Days with Lyn Hudgins (with the helmet on)

A Haul-a-Day Convention!

A Haul-a-Day Convention!

After Pedal Power provided the music, Open Air Cinema, another Bike Friday partner, provided movies powered by a Haul-a-Day.

After Pedal Power provided the music, Open Air Cinema, another Bike Friday partner, provided movies powered by a Haul-a-Day.

The Open Air Cinema setup can stream a You Tube video from a smartphone to an audience almost anywhere!

The Open Air Cinema setup can stream a You Tube video from a smartphone to an audience almost anywhere!

Add comment August 11, 2014

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